CAR BATTERY REPLACEMENT GUIDE

Batteries are usually overlooked when it comes to maintaining a car. It's one thing we seldom pay attention to. It's quite another to follow a good maintenance schedule. The battery is what starts the engine, and it is also what enables us to listen to music. In the same way that you should replace the oil, clean the filters, and perform other general maintenance on your car, treating the battery will ensure that your car runs smoothly and without problems.

Despite a friendly stranger giving you a jump, it is still possible that your battery is not in a good enough condition to hold a charge. Why is this? When your battery is discharging, some of the plates inside the battery disintegrate. At first, this has no noticeable impact on the battery's performance. As time passes, this effect begins to weaken the ability of the cell. It will become increasingly difficult to hold a charge. When the battery is not charging properly, it is also hard on your alternator

A loose battery can be determined in several ways. If your battery starts to deteriorate and can't hold a charge for long, you may notice the following:

  • Starting the engine takes too long or it doesn't even start. Despite the battery's capacity, the engine cannot be started.
  • When the ignition is turned on, the dash lights flicker or are dimmer than usual.
  • As you operate the power windows, the engine turns off suddenly or they operate at a slower rate than usual.
  • There should be a lot of corrosion or oxidation on the battery terminals to indicate a low battery.
  • There is likely to be an odor of sulfur around the battery (rotten egg odor). A leaky battery is to blame. Corrosion is another effect of leaks. It may be necessary to remove the gunk from around the leaks. Your car won't start if the gunk isn't removed.
  • The battery warning light in modern cars lights up when the battery is low.

Replace your battery if you experience any of the above problems.

Having a battery older than three years is considered an old-timer: Your battery can last well beyond three years, but you ought to have it inspected at least once a year once it reaches the three-year mark. Depending on the battery, life cycles are typically between three and five years. The actual life of your car battery can be drastically reduced by driving habits, weather, and frequent short trips (less than 20 minutes).

The life expectancy of a car battery is also dependent on the vehicle's condition and how you handle it. Cars in colder climates can have a shorter life expectancy. Whenever any of the above signs appear, the battery should be replaced before the electrics of your car are affected. Getting a new car battery is the only alternative to having your car's battery changed.

Even though replacing the battery won't blow a hole in your wallet, not replacing it will. Regular battery testing can help you to avoid getting stuck on the side of the road.

How often are car batteries replaced?

Climate and driving habits can shorten the life of your battery and make you need a new one before the three-year mark.

THE HOT WEATHER AND THE BATTERIES

High temperatures can damage your battery as well. With increasing temperatures and evaporating water, there is an increased likelihood and speed of corrosion, which results in battery draining and malfunctioning.

THE COLD WEATHER AND THE BATTERIES

Cold weather can cause battery problems just as much as hot weather. The battery needs to work harder to generate enough energy to keep your car running smoothly when the heat index turns to wind chill. In cold weather, the oil in your engine can thicken, making your battery work harder.

DRIVING HABITS AFFECT WHEN TO REPLACE A CAR BATTERY

Your car's usage over time may affect your battery's need to be replaced. You may not be able to fully recharge your battery between short trips like running to the office or grocery store, for example. Consequently, performance can be affected.

Even when your car is not running, the battery can continue to drain passively if it sits in the garage or driveway for long periods of time. You can use these battery-draining habits as an excuse to take a good ol' fashioned road trip.

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